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Beats has always had something of a hard ride from the audiophiles of the world.

Often criticised for being overpriced, too bass-heavy the brand has defied this snobbishness and ended up selling absolutely bucketloads of headphones.

While in the past some of the criticisms levelled against Beats would have been accurate the company has gone through something of a renaissance, starting just before being bought by Apple and reaching fever pitch in the last 12-months.

The results? Todays Beats headphones aren’t too expensive for what they offer, they’re not as bass-heavy and they’re a million miles from the snobbishness that has hung over them.

The latest example of this turnaround are the Studio3 Wireless headphones. They’re Beats’ flagship wireless headphones that offer Pure ANC noise-cancelling, improved battery-life and Apple’s very own W1 audio processor inside.

On the outside they look much the same as the previous Studio headphones.

A soft-touch matte plastic body keeps them light while small metal accents and leather earcups remind you that these are still premium headphones.

The design has always been sturdy and even without the carrying case our pair brushed off being thrown into a bag each day without any wear and tear.

The colour choices are of course influenced by Apple’s iPhone line-up but they’re implemented in a way that’s stylish and non-obtrusive.

The earcups are soft and well-cushioned making them comfortable on the ears, if we had one complaint it is that we did feel some minor pinching on the top of the head during listening periods of over an hour or so. That being said, out of the competition we’ve used only Sennheiser’s PXC 550′s stand out as being able to give us a full flight’s worth of comfortable listening.

It’s a tough one to call a judgement on because honestly it can sometimes just depend on the shape of your head.

Thanks to Apple’s W1 chip, setting these headphones up on an Apple device is fantastically easy - you simply turn them on and they’ll pop up on your iPhone. You then press connect and just like that they’re connected not only to your iPhone but also your Apple Watch, MacBook and iPad. It’s a neat trick and it’s one that sadly is exclusive to Apple’s family of devices. Thankfully if you’re an Android user, setup is still incredibly simple and just involves diving into the Bluetooth menu of your phone.

The Beats Studio3 offer a brand-new type of noise-cancelling called Pure ANC.

Traditionally, noise-cancelling works by having microphones on the outside of the headphones listening to the ambient noise. Software inside the headphones then recreates that ambient noise and inverts it, piping it through alongside your music and effectively cancelling the disturbance out.

According to Beats this is too heavy-handed an approach, so with its noise-cancelling its engineers decided to use something quite different.

The Studio3 still have the microphones on the outside, except this time it compares in real-time the noise-cancelled music with the original track.

It then looks for anomalies in the waveform between the two and makes tiny adjustments to best fit the original piece of music.

What’s pretty astonishing about all this is that it’s doing it 50,000 times every second.

Does it all work? The short answer is yes, but it’s not the absolute game-changer that Beats are making it out to be. The noise-cancelling is truly excellent, of that there’s no doubt, but it still suffers from the tiniest of hisses, something that almost all noise-cancelling headphones suffer from.

It’s also completely automated, so unlike Bose, Sennheiser or B&W there’s no way to fine-tune the settings or even change functions like the EQ. That’s a shame as it would have been nice to have more freedom over how they sound.

And how do they sound? Really, really good. These are by far and away Beats’ best-sounding headphones ever and it’s a testament to the progress the company has made. The mid-range is beautifully clear, and while the higher notes can feel a little underserved at times the bass is tightly delivered with a meaningful sense of oomph.

Are they perfect for listening to classical music? Probably not, but they do at last feel like a pair of really well-balanced headphones that can suit all genres admirably

Now where the Studio3′s really excel is with battery. It is obscenely good.

Beats claim you can get 22 hours of wireless playback with Pure ANC. It’s not lying either. We used ours for a full week of commuting and occasional listening in the office and found that we only needed to fully charge them once. If you turn the noise-cancelling off this increases to a whopping 40 hours.

Having this kind of battery life is absolutely vital for wireless headphones as one of the biggest barriers is the stigma that they become just one more thing to have to charge at the end of the day. If you only have to do that once a week it suddenly makes the whole proposition much more reasonable.

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Just like Beats’ other headphones, with Apple’s W1 chip inside you can also get some serious fast-charging out of them too. Just 10mins gives you around 2-3 hours of listening.

As a pair of everyday, premium headphones, the Studio3′s are absolutely brilliant. They’re cheaper than Bose and Sennheiser’s noise-cancelling flagships and they feel considerably more durable too. No they don’t offer customisation, but what they do offer the ultimate in convenience. You just turn them on, put them on your head and the outside world is placed on mute for as long as you want.

Who should buy the Beats Studio3 Wireless headphones?

These are a truly great pair of all-round noise-cancelling headphones. They’re incredibly easy to setup, offer a great sound profile that competes with some of the older audio giants and they boast an absolutely outrageous battery-life.

Who shouldn’t buy the Beats Studio3 Wireless headphones?

They can pinch a bit after long hours of listening so if you fly a lot or have a particularly long commute that’s definitely something to keep in mind. They don’t offer the app-based customisation that you can get from competitors either so if you’re looking to fine-tune your audio we’d recommend looking elsewhere.

The Beats Studio3 Wireless headphones are available now for £299.

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London’s electric black cab has, we think it’s fair to say, been a long time coming.

Well today the company that makes the vehicles has confirmed that six of them are currently driving around the capital as they go through the final and perhaps most gruelling test environment: London’s traffic.

The six vehicles and their drivers will be collecting data that records not only the emissions coming from the vehicle but also looks to asses the state of London’s charging network.

Each car is driven by an electric motor which can then be charged via a 1.3 litre petrol-powered generator.

The car has a fully-electric range of around 70-miles but if you turn on the petrol generator that range increases to some 400-miles.

While it’s certainly not going to compete with the range of say a Tesla, these vehicles have been designed to at the very least comply with the “zero emission capable” requirement for all London taxis from January 2018.

Compared to the previous petrol-powered black cabs, the new TX5 has a larger cabin that contains six seats, WiFi, USB-charging and the ability to process contactless payments.

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The driver meanwhile will have access to a full-touchscreen that provides them with a SatNav specifically designed to show congestion while also showing every available charging location in London.

In addition the screen will also feature integrated ride-hailing services including Gett, myTaxi and Kabbee.

The cabs are expected to get a full roll out on London’s streets later this year.

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In their quest to take over the world and replace human beings, robots were missing one always crucial element - the ability to perform tasks quite as effectively as people do.

But now all that has changed.

A team of robotics engineers in the USA have made an “important breakthrough” in developing a flexible skin that allows machines to feel what they are doing (and when it is going wrong) so they can rectify the situation.

It’s a feature that will make them better at everything from cooking an omelette to dismantling roadside bombs.

In order for robots to perform delicate tasks, such as cooking, housework, or surgery, they need to know whether a small or delicate object is slipping out of their grasp.

Jonathan Posner, a senior author on the study, said: “If a robot is going to dismantle an improvised explosive device, it needs to know whether it’s hand is sliding along a wire or pulling on it. Or to hold on to a medical instrument, it needs to know if the object is slipping.”

To date it has been impossible for robotic hands to accurately sense the vibrations and forces that occur, for example, when an object is starting to fall.

Some robots already use fully instrumented fingers but that sense of ‘touch’ is still limited to that appendage and such skins have not yet provided a full range of tactile information.

But the team from the University of Washington have now created a bio-inspired skin that can be stretched over any part of a robot, or prosthetic, to successfully grasp and manipulate objects in everyday tasks.

This is a giant step forward in the effective application real-world of robotics.

The skin, manufactured at the nanofabrication facility,  is made from the same silicone rubber used in swimming goggles and embedded with tiny serpentine channels that are roughly half the width of a human hair. 

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These channels are filled with electronically conductive liquid metal, which won’t crack or fatigue as solid wires do.

And prototypes have shown they are able to measure tactile information with more precision and sensitivity than human skin.

This development is so important because it will allow robots in the future to open doors, interact with a phone, shake hands, pick up packages, and handle objects, among many other things.

Associate professor Veronica Santos, says: “The fact that our latest skin prototype incorporates all three modalities creates many new possibilities for machine learning-based approaches for advancing robot capabilities.”

Scarily human.

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Greenpeace has released its latest ‘Greener Electronics’ report in which it ranks each of the major tech companies on their commitment to environmentally friendly practices.

While Apple featured as the second most responsible company, Amazon faced heavy criticism from the report with the authors going so far as to say it is “one of the least transparent companies in the world in terms of its environmental performance.”

Each company is given a score that is based on numerous factors that include the cleanliness of their supply chain, how reusable their products are and even their level advocacy on the political stage.

As you can see from the scoring sheet, other poor performers include Samsung, Huawei and Asus.

The reports authors Gary Cook and Elizabeth Jardim criticised Amazon not only for its complete lack of transparency but also with the way it handles hazardous chemicals within its own supply chain.

“While Amazon highlights the importance it places on responsible sourcing, it provides little information beyond its broad supply chain standards.” states the report.

“Amazon does not publish details on whether it has placed restrictions or eliminated hazardous materials not covered by the current Rohs standard, such as PVC, brominated flame retardants, or phthalates, as many leading companies have done.”

In terms of its commitment to change its supply chain for the better, the company also scored terribly.

“Amazon has not made any commitment to eliminate hazardous chemicals from its products or the manufacturing process of its supply chain,” the report concludes.

Oddly despite its own lack of transparency, Amazon scored well in one single are and that was advocacy. The authors commended Amazon’s recent support of policies in the US that would reduce greenhouse emissions and support the rollout of renewable energy.

Of the remaining tech giants, Apple enjoyed the second-highest score in the report with the authors praising Apple’s commitment to renewable energy and to meaningful changes to its supply chain.

While its flagship example will be its brand-new space-age headquarters Apple Park that’s 100% powered by renewable energy, the report also praises Apple for its commitment to using renewable energy overseas.

“Apple has thus far been fairly aggressive in pursuing its 2020 goal to deploy 4GW of renewable energy in its supply chain,” states the report. “With Apple itself having deployed nearly 500MW of solar and wind in China, and has made significant progress with its suppliers as well.”

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In April Apple also made a major commitment to closed-loop manufacturing which essentially means it will stop mining for new precious metals or toxic materials and instead only use recycled materials from its older handsets.

While the report praises this, it does also point out the limitations that Apple has placed on itself including the fact that newer products like the new MacBook are actually making it harder for Apple to repair them thus increasing wastage.

Other poor performers included Samsung who was singled out in particular because of the sheer size of its influence over the technology industry.

“In neither Samsung’s product lines nor the operation of its factories did we find much evidence that reducing Samsung’s environmental impact has been been made a priority by the company’s leadership.”

“Samsung has not kept pace with the efforts of Apple to reduce its greenhouse gas footprint and transition its factories to renewable sources of energy, and has seen its emissions rapidly climb as a result.”

You can read the full report here, which includes both an overview of the general performance of each company and then includes a much more in-depth analysis of how each one performs.

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In the fight against cancer, one of the greatest hurdles can actually be our own immune system, which self-sabotages attempts by the body to fight against the invading tumour.

Now researchers have successfully found a way to get around this immune response resulting in a “significant delay” in cancer growth, and ultimately letting animals survive for longer.

The human immune system naturally has a series of in-built ‘brakes’ that automatically stop our bodies from going into overdrive - a mechanism that prevents an excessive response when foreign material infects us.

However necessary these defences are for normal bodily function, the immunological checkpoints also make us our own worst enemies.

This is because tumours are able to use and abuse these brakes by posing as the body’s own tissue, and effectively hiding in plain sight.

Powerful killer T cells, which swarm in huge numbers and destroy all infected cells (including, in principle, cancerous ones), can be outmaneuvered and abused.

The tumours are then protected to a certain degree by the very cells meant to be obliterating them.

But now, researchers from the University of Bonn, have been able to use a protein naturally produced in the body (IKKß inhibitor) to release the brakes.

The IKKß inhibitor has long been known to be a immunostimulant - a protein that promotes the activation of immune cells - and responsible for not activating them when they are needed.

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So the team used a pharmaceutical ingredient mixed with IKKβ in a test tube, to try and block it, and subsequently kill off the regulatory T cells, leaving the killer T cells space to survive and breed.  

Christoph Heuser, who worked on the study, said: “We were thus able to significantly increase the impact of the killer T cells.”

Testing this method in mice with skin cancer, they found that two weeks of treatment did cause the number of regulatory T cells to fall by 50% and make the killer cells stronger, but it wasn’t effective at totally saving the mice from the disease.

It just postponed the inevitable.

Professor Christian Kurts, says: “Complete healing cannot be achieved solely by inhibiting IKKß...however, be possible to stimulate the immune system to more effectively combat the cancer.”

The study could pave the way for more effective cancer therapies in the future.

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The placenta may be the most important organ in a body - it gives life to us all - and yet it is probably the least-studied organ.

The placenta is the gatekeeper for a foetus, allowing a mother's nutrients to pass in one direction while waste passes back into the mother's bloodstream. It produces hormones to encourage foetal growth and offers protection against most bacteria, although not against viruses.

But, when the placenta fails to function normally, it can put the health and life of both foetus and mother at serious risk, leading to hundreds of thousands of deaths every year. Among the biggest such problems is pre-eclampsia, which kills half a million babies and around 76,000 mothers every year globally.

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The condition affects up to 5 per cent of all pregnancies - Kim Kardashian recently suffered both pre-eclampsia and placenta accreta, another dangerous condition in which the placenta grows too deeply into the wall of the uterus.

Even when babies survive pre-eclampsia, they can suffer from growth restriction or other health problems, including brain and heart defects, and diabetes, later in life. Growth restriction is the most common factor in still-births, when there are insufficient placental blood vessels to keep the foetus nourished.

And how do we treat this killer condition? The tools we have are no more advanced than aspirin, and premature deliveries.

Aspirin is our frontline tool but is effective only if taken early in pregnancy. Other drugs combat symptoms, such as lowering blood pressure.

Ultimately, our only prevention is to induce premature delivery.

Research into the placenta is desperately needed, which is why my team at Aston Medical School is developing a radical new way of carrying out tests on the organ.

The Aston University team will collaborate with engineers from a Dutch company, Mimetas, developing a method of growing human placentas on a 'chip' - we call it iPlacenta. The placentas are grown from cells harvested from umbilical cords, and so treatments can be tested without any risk to either mothers or foetuses.

These chips, which are about the size of a mobile phone, will hold up to 48 miniature placentas, each one of which can be an individual experiment. The chips can be slotted into existing equipment to make analysis both relatively easy and inexpensive.

The tiny placentas can also mimic the organ's diseased state, hopefully allowing us an insight into how pre-eclampsia develops, so the condition can ultimately be identified and treated early.

This new research may be groundbreaking - even growing a single placenta would be an achievement - but it's only one of three approaches we are taking at Aston. We're also working on ultrasound techniques, with Samsung and FUJIFILM VisualSonics, to better understand the placenta and help us identify those most at risk.

And we're also teaming up with mathematicians at the University of Rostock in Germany to build a huge computer model to help us understand pre-eclampsia. Ultimately, our ambition is to be able to use this model to predict outcomes for individual patients, and to help us build experiments for our iPlacenta chips.

The Aston research I coordinate is backed by €4million funding from the EU's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme, and will involve experts in ten different centres feeding information into our programme. We are based at the UK's newest medical school, at Aston University, which is headed up by Professor Asif Ahmed, a worldwide authority on pre-eclampsia.

Our research is really only just beginning and, as well as bringing health benefits, we hope that eventually our work will save the health service money - a lot of money.

It has been estimated that premature births cost the NHS almost £1billion a year, and that delaying premature births by just one week could save the NHS £260million a year - that's because premature babies tend to need the highest levels of care.

But, as important as the financial costs are, it's the human costs that are most significant. Kim Kardashian has been candid about the suffering pre-eclampsia and placenta accreta caused her, and she has access to the finest medical teams.

Tens of millions of other mothers around the world are not so lucky, which is why we need to be able to identify these conditions and treat them long before they become life-threatening and require major medical intervention.

This is, literally, a matter of life and death - for both mothers, and for babies who have barely started their lives.

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It's a familiar sight - the uniformed security guard patrolling the store on the lookout for shoplifters, ready to spring into action to stop thieves from getting away with the goods. Retailers have long known the value of proactive security to prevent loss and act as a deterrent in the real world. However, it seems that in the virtual world the retail security guard is out of shape, unable to keep up with the almost continuous threat of cyberattack. In a recent A10 Networks global survey 29% of participants felt that the retail sector is the least prepared to respond to cyberattacks. This was far higher than sectors such as finance and government. Why is retail so vulnerable and what are the challenges to overcome so that customers can shop in safety?

Sale of the century for cybercriminals

The retail sector is a seductive target for cybercriminals. High transaction volumes, including spikes at predictable times such as the holiday season and Black Friday, offer plenty of opportunities for fraudsters to get in amongst legitimate purchasers and make a profit. Beyond direct fraud, the vast quantity of customer data collected by retailers is of immense value to cybercriminals, who offer it for sale on the deep and dark web. The sector is also a target for hacktivists looking for notoriety; bringing down a major retailer's site with a DDoS attack over the holiday season will certainly make you famous.

Attacks on the retail sector are on the rise. PWC recently found that attacks globally were up by 30% year on year and the number of serious data breaches in retail firms reported to the UK Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) has doubled. In a climate where customers are increasingly aware of the importance of privacy and the risks of identity theft, this statistic is a big problem for retailers. A report by MediaPro found that 84 percent of shoppers would change their shopping habits if a retailer experienced a cyberattack, with 49 percent saying that they would be unlikely to buy from that retailer in future. In the fast-paced world of online retail, this reputational damage can cost millions. On top of this, the implementation of the GDPR in 2018 is going to make the financial consequences of data losses far heavier, with organisations facing fines of up to 4% of annual turnover should their management of customer data be found to be in breach.

Key challenges for retail

Retailers have an enormous incentive to gather customer data to drive sales and marketing programmes. They are less heavily regulated than sectors such as finance or government so the drive to put data security first is not so strong. However, as they respond to competitive pressure to develop multichannel shopping experiences and offer customer-enticing loyalty schemes, so they also create more potential points of attack and opportunities for cybercriminals to take advantage. Evidence suggests that security systems are not evolving alongside retail innovations, with only 58% of retailers reporting that they have an overall security strategy in place. This needs to improve if the sector is to protect itself from cyberattacks of increasing frequency and sophistication. As they take advantage of the efficiencies and scalability of cloud and other technologies, retailers need to be confident that their systems can detect and neutralise malicious activity and protect customer data as it is transferred around the organisation.

Another challenge lies in the fact that retail is staff-intensive. People can be security's best asset or its biggest weakness, but in the UK government's 2017 cyber security breaches survey, only 33% of retail executives believed that core staff took security seriously. This figure compared with 63% in the finance industry - perhaps an indication of the stringent regulations governing that sector. Staff turnover in retail is generally higher than in other industries, so it can be a challenge to keep on top of educating staff about their security responsibilities, but it's not something that can be shirked as the consequences of poor practices can be severe.

Retail is an important part of everyday life and customers value ease of use and convenience very highly. But they also value their private information. If retailers are going to continue to be trusted by their customers, they need to get their security guards up to scratch in the virtual world as well as in the real one.

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In April this year, the UK went its first full day without the use of energy from coal since the Industrial Revolution. As the first country to use coal for electricity, this is a watershed moment for the low carbon revolution. In fact, the UK energy supply was only 2% from coal in the first half of 2017, down from some 40% of total supply just 5 years ago.

As a result of rapidly falling costs of solar and wind power, and in response to meeting emissions reductions targets, there has been significant increase in investment into renewable energy and phasing out of coal based power stations in the UK. The effect of this structural change is also in evidence when National Grid reported that at lunchtime on the 7th June 2017, for the first time in excess of 50% of the UK's electricity needs were met by power from wind, solar, hydro and wood pellets. With the addition of nuclear, at 2pm this reached 72.1% from carbon neutral generation.

The price of renewables continues to fall due to improved technology and uptake - solar and wind is now either the same price or cheaper than new fossil fuel capacity in more than 30 countries, according to a report from the World Economic Forum released earlier this year. However, the rapid adoption of these new technologies is causing concerns in some quarters.

One major argument used against renewables is that they do not produce a consistent base-load type of power like fossil fuels due to being intermittent - not generating power when the wind is not blowing or sun not shining. However, this is being answered by rapid improvements in battery storage systems and an increasingly flexible grid. Battery system costs are dropping fast, which means that power generated from the sun and wind can be stored for future use, which dramatically reduces the need for base-load generation.

The Storage Holy Grail
Improved battery technology and lower costs has been mainly driven by the rapidly growing electric vehicle (EV) market. The costs of Lithium Ion battery packs have dropped by 90% in 10 years, which is now creating a timely opportunity to increase the use of renewable energy, and strengthen the current power grid. This is also enabling both industrial users and consumers to gain better control over their energy usage and power bills.

The benefits of battery-based storage systems are multiple. Battery storage systems can provide greater grid stability, and also enable power generators of many types to maximise revenue and minimise costs. Behind the meter, on the demand side, users can better control bills and optimise local renewable power consumption. In addition, battery storage systems allow for more resilient power for the rare cases where the grid fails such as when there are natural disasters such as the flooding seen in recent years in the UK and other places.

On a larger scale, battery systems are generating revenue by providing ancillary services to the grid transmission systems. Such markets are expected to grow for smaller systems in aggregate in coming years. Another exciting development that storage enables is microgrids. Here, local, distributed power generation and storage can allow portions of the grid and critical facilities to operate independently of the larger national grid when necessary, helping reduce the overall potential for unforeseen blackouts. These microgrids - whether large or small - ensure resiliency and stability of supply and a reduction of CO2 emissions.

The car and home as energy providers
In its first major move to support the nascent battery revolution, the UK government announced in June 2017 that it is poised to invest £246m in battery technology, and that it will be a key pillar in its industrial strategy.

These recent announcements in support of battery technologies are welcome. What is now expected and needed is more transparency and the removal of barriers to allow small systems to participate in the ancillary services markets. Doing so would also foster the growth of the local ecosystems that will help to achieve the transformation of the energy markets and modernise the grid. For example, people with EV cars will eventually also let them provide power back to the grid and thus offset the cost of the cars.

Overall, the long-lasting argument that renewables are unreliable is short lived. With so many advancements within the renewable energy sector coming to head, the 'sun not shining at night' and "wind does not always blow" concerns are rapidly becoming obsolete. As costs continue to drop, and battery system and ancillary services continue to expand, there is a huge opportunity for complete structural changes within the energy sector. And with supportive regulation changes and increased transparency for markets, the future is certainly bright for UK's energy supply moving forward.

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Ever wondered how far you can zoom out of Google Maps?

Recently Google announced that it had added the International Space Station to both Google Maps and Street View.

But what if you wanted to go even further? Well Google has just made it possible to visit Pluto from right within Google Maps.

How do you do it? Simple, just zoom out of Google Maps until you’re looking down on Earth from space. Zoom out further and Google will automatically pull up a list of all the planets, moons and asteroids that you can now visit.

Once you click on them you’ll be flown through the solar system until you reach your destination.

Using the iconic pictures captured by Cassini almost 20 years ago Google has now added a total of 12 worlds and asteroids that you can now explore in ultra-fine detail.

The beautifully stitched worlds were all created by astronomical artist Björn Jónsson who used imagery from both NASA and the European Space Agency archives.

Google recently announced a new version of Street View for Oculus Rift and HTC Vive that would allow users to virtually fly over just about any location on Earth.

The hope is that in the future, you’ll be able to fly through the solar system as well.

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It’s no secret that the internet can be a cesspit of anonymous trolling and bad behaviour from behind the safety of a computer screen.

So what happens when an app is created purely for people to pay each other compliments? Well, it will be downloaded over 5 million times, have 2.5 million daily users and then be bought by Facebook.

After only nine weeks on the market, one of the biggest players in the tech industry has announced it will be acquiring TBH app - meaning ‘to be honest’ - and the team of four people who run it.

In a longstanding bid to reconnect with a younger audience being lost to Snapchat - industry forecasters predicted Facebook growth among those aged 12 to 17 and 18 to 24 would fall by 2.8% and 3.1% respectively in 2017 - the social network has seized an unmissable opportunity to win over teens.

The app, which is targeted solely towards senior-school-aged children, is centred around emoji-filled quizzes that allow users to swap compliments anonymously.

Users can poll friends on their personality and physical attributes, receiving a stream of nice messages and confidence boosting.

The company’s mission is focused on positivity online: “While the last decade of the Internet has been focused on open communication, the next milestone will be around meeting people’s emotional needs.”

And it seems to be working, given positive feedback on social media.

Creator Nikita Bier told TechCrunch: “If we’re improving the mental health of millions of teens, that’s a success to us.”

In the official announcement, on Monday, Facebook said that meeting with the TBH creators they realised they shared a “common goal” of building community and bringing people closer together through social networking.

According to an official statement the move will not change the standalone user experience for the time being.

Currently it is only available in the USA, with a state-by-state rollout in the last week - but it has been in the Appstore top ten for weeks, including two consecutive weeks at the number one spot.

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